Diabetes From COVID

New research has found that the coronavirus can damage cells in the pancreas that are responsible for creating insulin, which may explain why some individuals have been diagnosed with diabetes after being infected with COVID-19. Data collected in the Lombardy region of Italy that experienced the deadliest COVID-19 outbreaks, suggests that pediatric Type 1 Diabetes […]

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New research has found that the coronavirus can damage cells in the pancreas that are responsible for creating insulin, which may explain why some individuals have been diagnosed with diabetes after being infected with COVID-19.

Data collected in the Lombardy region of Italy that experienced the deadliest COVID-19 outbreaks, suggests that pediatric Type 1 Diabetes incidence significantly increased in 2020 compared to the 3 previous years. Indeed, the number of Type 1 Diabetes diagnoses, DKA at onset, severe DKA and pediatric intensive care unit admissions differed between the first and the second COVID-19 waves (COVID-19 ARIA. Regione Lombardia).

The number of people developing diabetes after being infected with the virus has significantly grown in recent months, healthcare professionals say.

Insulin Due To Inflammation

Several explanations for this surge have been put forward, including that the disease spreads into pancreatic cells through the ACE2 receptor located on the outer layer of lung cells, and that vigorous antibodies reacting to the infection could unintentionally harm the pancreatic cells. ACE2 acts as the receptor for the SARS-CoV-2 virus and allows it to infect the cell. 

Tissues becoming less reactive to insulin due to inflammation in the body is also thought to be a possible cause.

A team of international academics identified what organisms can be infected with COVID-19 by testing a range of cells and organoids, which are a man-made group of cells that copy organ functions. They found that colon, liver, heart, lung and pancreatic organoids and brain cells that make dopamine were all easily infectible. Additionally, they reported that beta cells within the pancreas that create insulin were damaged after being infected, causing them to produce a lower dose of the hormone.

The post Diabetes From COVID appeared first on Medicine.sbs.

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